Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

An MRI scan, unlike a CT scan or X-ray, does not use radiation to capture the images - it uses the property of magnetic resonance. An MRI scan combines images to create a 3D picture of the patient’s internal structures. It is used to detect abnormalities in small structures of the brain such as the pituitary gland and brain stem. Sometimes a contrast agent (dye) is administered intravenously to better visualise certain structures or abnormalities.

How is it performed?

  • Before the scan begins, the patient is asked to change into a hospital gown and all metal objects, like jewellery, dentures and so on, must be removed.
  • While performing the scan, it is important that the patient lies still in order to obtain the clearest images. If they are unable to do so, a mild sedative might be given.
  • The patient lies down on a table that slides into the MRI machine.
  • Once the scan begins, the table slides into the machine till the part of the body that needs to be scanned is under the circular magnetic structure.
  • A technician then takes several images of the suggested area. The test normally takes 30 to 60 minutes.
  • The patient may be given a contrast solution through an IV, usually gadolinium, to take images of certain parts of the body, particularly the blood vessels.
  • Once the scan is completed, the table is pulled out of the machine and the patient can leave the room.
  • The images are then sent to the radiologist for examination.
  • The MRI scanner makes loud banging noises during the procedure. Our MRI scanner has a wide bore, specifically to cater to claustrophobic patients and an immersive audio-visual experience to help them stay calm.
  • There are no risks associated with an MRI scan. However, there is a slight chance of developing an allergic reaction to a contrast solution.

Other Procedures

Computed Tomography

Read More

X-ray Imaging

Read More

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Read More