Colonoscopy

Colonoscopy

The colon is the lowest portion of the gastrointestinal tract that takes in food, absorbs nutrients and disposes of waste. A thin, flexible camera on the end of a tube, called a colonoscope, is used to check for abnormalities or disease in your lower intestine or colon. Colonoscopy can be done as a screening for colon cancer, to explore the cause of unexplained changes in bowel habits, evaluate symptoms of pain or bleeding located in the abdominal area, and find a reason for weight loss, chronic constipation or diarrhea

How is it performed?

 

  • An hour before the procedure, the patient is given an enema to empty their bowels or they might be recommended a laxative the night before.
  • Just before the colonoscopy, most people get a sedative.
  • The patient lies on their side with their knees drawn up to their chest.
  • The doctor guides a flexible, lighted tube called a colonoscope into the patient’s anus and guides it up through the rectum and into the colon.
  • A camera on the end of the colonoscope transmits images to a monitor.
  • Once the scope is positioned, the doctor will inflate the colon using carbon dioxide gas to gain a better view.
  • The doctor may remove polyps or a tissue sample for biopsy during this procedure.
  • The entire procedure takes about 40 minutes to an hour.

Other Procedures

Upper GI endoscopy

Read More

Sigmoidoscopy

Read More

Colonoscopy

Read More

High resolution esophageal manometry

Read More

24 hour pH impedance monitoring

Read More

Anorectal manometry

Read More

Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)

Read More