Knee arthroscopy

Knee arthroscopy

Knee arthroscopy is a surgical procedure that can diagnose and treat problems in the knee joint. A tiny camera is inserted into the knee to investigate and, if necessary, correct the issue. Arthroscopy diagnoses problems such as a torn meniscus, swollen synovium (the lining in the joint) or a misaligned patella (kneecap). It can also repair the ligaments of the joint. A doctor may recommend knee arthroscopy for those experiencing knee pain. It is most common during the treatment of sports injuries.

How is it performed?

  • The patient may either be administered local, spinal or general anaesthesia for this procedure.
  • After the surgical site is sterilised, the surgeon begins by making a few small incisions in the knee.
  • Sterile salt water (saline) is then pumped in to expand the knee, making it easier for the surgeon to visualise the joint.
  • The arthroscope, which is a tiny camera at the end of a flexible tube, is inserted into one of the cuts. This enables the surgeon to visualise the joint and identify the cause of pain.
  • When the surgeon locates the problem, they may then insert small tools into the incisions to correct the issue.
  • After the procedure, the surgeon closes up the incision and bandages the knee.
  • Post surgery, depending on the damage and the procedure done to rectify it, the patient might either be discharged the same day or the next day.
  • Subsequently, the doctor may suggest an exercise regimen to follow at home or recommend physiotherapy. The exercises are necessary to help restore full range of motion and strengthen the surrounding muscles.

Other Procedures

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Knee arthroscopy

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